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EU Referendum

Schools ‘could face an extra 570,000 pupils from the EU by 2030’: Vote Leave warn of huge classroom swell brought on by new member states joining

Brexit campaigners say schools will become flooded with migrant children
Say between 261,000 and 571,000 youngsters will join education system
Claim it will be knock-on effect of five states applying for EU membership
Tory cabinet minister Priti Patel said extra demand would put pressure on already ‘overstretched’ schools

British schools face an influx of 261,000 children from the EU if Remain wins, Brexit campaigners claimed last night.
Vote Leave warned the figure could swell to 571,000 by 2030 if all five states up for EU membership – Albania, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia and Turkey – join in the near future.

Priti Patel, a Tory cabinet minister, said the extra demand would put pressure on already ‘overstretched’ schools.
British schools face an influx of 261,000 children from the EU if Remain wins, Brexit campaigners claimed last night. Vote Leave British schools face an influx of 261,000 children from the EU if Remain wins, Brexit campaigners claimed last night. Vote Leave warned the figure could swell to 571,000 by 2030 if all five states up for EU membership – Albania, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia and Turkey – join in the near future
British schools face an influx of 261,000 children from the EU if Remain wins, Brexit campaigners claimed last night. Vote Leave warned the figure could swell to 571,000 by 2030 if all five states up for EU membership – Albania, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia and Turkey – join in the near future


As the referendum campaign headed into its final day:
A senior EU politician warned Europe had lost control of its borders;
Migrants at Calais tried to storm their way into Britain;
David Cameron complained the debate had ‘become very narrowly focused’ on immigration;
Theresa May made a last-ditch legal bid to deport an Italian killer allowed to stay in Britain by ‘dangerous’ EU rules;
The number of EU migrants applying for UK citizenship rocketed by 30 per cent;
It emerged more than 100,000 students a year from outside Europe are failing to go home after finishing their courses;
Germany’s finance minister said he sympathised with British voters fed up with the EU’s ‘self-regarding’ leaders.

Vote Leave said the increase in school-age European nationals was likely to add between £1billion and £1.9billion to the cost of the UK’s annual education budget by 2030.
The campaign calculates that between 2000 and 2014, some 152,000 school-age migrants came to the UK from other EU countries.

HILTON STICKS TO HIS GUNS IN TARGETS ROW
David Cameron’s former adviser refused to back down last night as the PM refuted claims he was warned four years ago it was ‘impossible’ to keep his net migration promises while Britain remained in the EU.

The PM insisted his former closest adviser Steve Hilton was ‘simply not right’ and that immigration had been falling in 2012 when the adviser said reducing its level from hundreds of thousands every year to ‘tens of thousands’ would never be hit.

But Mr Hilton – who made his claims in yesterday’s Mail – stuck to his guns. He said he had been in No 10 when officials delivered ‘projections that showed there was no way we could meet the target within the EU’.

Justice Secretary Michael Gove backed Mr Hilton last night. He said: ‘Making promises and then saddling yourself with a political union that means you cannot deliver those promises doesn’t contribute to an atmosphere of trust in politics.’

In 2014 alone, the figure stood at 25,000. This is a seven-fold increase on the 3,000 children who came in 2004 – the year Poland and seven other Eastern European countries joined the EU.

A continued annual influx of this size would require the equivalent of about 27 new average-sized secondary schools – or 100 primary schools.
The number of school-age children with one or more parent from a non-UK European nation has more than doubled from 309,000 in 2007 to 699,000, said Vote Leave.

Based on its own estimates of future immigration if the UK remains in the EU, the campaign group calculated that at least a further 261,000 could join the school system over the coming 15 years – or as many as 571,000 if the union expands.

Miss Patel said: ‘The EU is undemocratic and interferes too much in our daily lives.

‘We have seen that with the scale of migration, and the impact this has had on local communities – and key public services such as the NHS, housing and schools.

‘With more countries waiting to join the EU, including Albania, Serbia, and Turkey – and with British taxpayers paying almost £2billion to help them join – this problem can only get worse.’
The warning on Europe’s borders came from Sebastian Kurz, Austria’s foreign minister.
Priti Patel (pictured), a Tory cabinet minister, said the extra demand would put pressure on already 'overstretched' schools
Priti Patel (pictured), a Tory cabinet minister, said the extra demand would put pressure on already ‘overstretched’ schools


‘The fact is that we have lost control,’ said Mr Kurz. ‘At the moment it is not us as the EU that is deciding who comes into Europe, it is the people smugglers.’
Mr Kurz, who is a conservative, said the only way to tackle the crisis was to stop accepting illegal arrivals. They should instead be taken away to camps in Africa or elsewhere.


MIGRANTS IN RUSH FOR UK PASSPORTS
The number of EU citizens granted UK passports has surged by 29 per cent in a year in the run-up to the referendum.

In 2015, some 12,970 EU nationals had citizenship applications rubber-stamped by the Home Office, up from 10,071 in 2014. It was also a rise from 7,406 in 2011, or 75 per cent.

EU citizens have full rights to live and work here, but experts said there was anecdotal evidence that concerns about Brexit had fuelled a spike in citizenship applications.

An academic said EU migrants who lived in the UK and had married British citizens would want their status ‘nailed down’.In a bid to regain the initiative on migration, Mr Cameron last night claimed that if Britain votes Remain he would push for more reform of freedom of movement rules.‘Reform doesn’t end on June 23, the voice of reform will be strengthened, because we will have had a referendum,’ he said. However, George Osborne has already ruled out any significant changes – such as imposing a brake on the numbers coming inIn a series of interviews, the PM accused Leave campaigners of stoking division and intolerance.

He said all sides of the Out campaign had ‘become very narrowly focused’ on the issue of immigration and warned that the decision could have consequences.
‘I’ve always believed that we have to be able to discuss and to debate immigration,’ he said. ‘But I’ve always believed that this is an issue that needs careful handling.
‘We are talking to a country that has a lot of people who have fled persecution and contribute a massive amount to our country. It does need great care.’
Describing the UK as ‘arguably the most successful, multi-ethnic, multi-faith, opportunity democracy anywhere on earth’, Mr Cameron told the Guardian a Remain vote would send ‘a very clear message that we’ve rejected this idea that Britain is narrow and insular and inward-looking’.

100,000 STUDENTS A YEAR OVERSTAY
More than 100,000 students a year from outside Europe are failing to go home after finishing their courses, a report reveals.

Between 2010 and 2013 the influx of non-EU students averaged 156,000 a year, the report published by think-tank MigrationWatch, based on Office for National Statistics figures, showed. But between 2012 and 2015, when they would have been expected to graduate, an average of 46,000 a year left – an annual difference of 110,000.

Some will take legitimate jobs, be given permission to settle here with a partner or pursue further studies. But tens of thousands exploit a lax visa system to stay unlawfully.

Wolfgang Schäuble, the powerful German finance minister, said he sympathised with British voters who want to leave the European Union and its ‘self- regarding’ leadership that has gone ‘too far’ and lost touch with voters across the continent.
He said: ‘Perhaps we didn’t understand quite correctly, and it’s led to an excessive level of self-regard in the institutions and apparatuses in Brussels and Luxembourg.
‘Perhaps we went too far and to some extent lost contact with our citizens.’

THE ITALIAN KILLER WE CAN’T DEPORT
Ministers yesterday made a last-ditch bid to deport an Italian killer allowed to stay in Britain by ‘dangerous’ EU rules.
The 58-year-old, who was granted anonymity by the courts, killed his flatmate and was sentenced to eight years for manslaughter at the Old Bailey in 2002. After his release, the Home Office tried to deport him, but he appealed, sparking a decade-long legal farce.Tory justice minister and prominent Leave campaigner Dominic Raab slammed EU diktats on removing foreign offenders as ‘dangerous and undemocratic’.

The Supreme Court yesterday heard submissions from lawyers for Home Secretary Theresa May. A ruling is expected later this year.

DATA FAILURES ‘LET RAPISTS INTO THE UK’
Dangerous criminals including rapists, killers and paedophiles are able to move freely into Britain because of failures in data-sharing among European nations, a study has found.

The report by academics at De Montfort University in Leicester said ‘significant barriers’ existed to information exchange across EU borders.

These included differing definitions of sex attackers and violent thugs and ‘problematic’ access to conviction data.

Campaigners will seize on the research as evidence that Britain can regain control of its borders only by quitting the EU.

 

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3653534/Schools-face-extra-570-000-pupils-EU-2030-Vote-Leave-warn-huge-classroom-swell-brought-new-member-states-joining.html

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