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Brexit

Why Trump’s victory is a timely reminder to those in Britain who defy the will of the people by RICHARD LITTLEJOHN

  • The rule of thumb used to be that all politics is local. No it’s not, it’s global
  • Trump promised the outcome of the election would be ‘Brexit, plus, plus…’
  • It was sweet revenge for the 58 million Americans Hillary smeared as ‘Deplorables’

Brexit.

We should have seen it coming, Hillary’s crestfallen cheerleaders complained. We told you so, said the Trump camp.

Trump didn’t just beat Clinton, he steam-rollered the Republican establishment, first by winning the party’s nomination and then by capturing the White House in spectacular style


The rule of thumb used to be that all politics is local. No it’s not, it’s global, is the new refrain.

Trump spotted it early. He promised that the outcome of this election would be ‘Brexit, plus, plus, plus . . .’

He was right. While there were local factors which propelled him to victory in rustbelt states such as Pennsylvania and Ohio, Hillary Clinton’s crushing defeat was part of the revolt on both sides of the Atlantic against the arrogant, self-selecting, self-perpetuating ‘liberal’ elite.

This was the sweet revenge of 58 million decent Americans Hillary smeared as ‘Deplorables’.

The sheer lack of comprehension on the faces of pro-Clinton commentators was a joy to behold. It reflected the shell-shock of the Remainers as it dawned on them that the Brexiteers had won.

Trump tapped into the same sense of alienation and anger which inspired so many people in Britain to vote Leave — the feeling that the smug political class and their celebrity sycophants have been lording it over the rest of us for far too long.

The sheer lack of comprehension on the faces of pro-Clinton commentators was a joy to behold.  It reflected the shell-shock of the Remainers after realising Brexit had won 


The revolt against the Democrats in traditional, blue-collar, working-class states mirrored the rejection of Labour in so many constituencies in the North of England. Similarly, Trump’s triumph had echoes of the rise of Ukip and the collapse of Call Me Dave’s Labour Lite project.

He didn’t just beat Clinton, he steam-rollered the Republican establishment, first by winning the party’s nomination and then by capturing the White House in spectacular style.

The result has shattered not one, but two dynasties that have dominated U.S. politics for almost 30 years, as well as torpedoing the legacy of America’s first black president, Barack Obama.

To win the Republican nomination, Trump slaughtered Jeb Bush, who would have been the third member of his family to occupy the Oval Office had he been successful. To win the White House, he trampled over Hillary Clinton, the former First Lady, whose ocean-going sense of entitlement made Gordon Brown look like a man who only became Prime Minister under duress.

The Bush family’s betrayal of the grassroots Republican voters who put them into office was manifest in their refusal to back Trump and the announcement of George H.W. Bush, father of Jeb and Dubya, that he would be voting for their hated arch-rival — and wife of his own nemesis — Hillary Clinton.

It only served to reinforce the already widely held view that the real divide in America was not between the two main parties, but between the aloof political class in Washington and the people who pay their wages.

Under Barack Obama, politicians and judges spent more time obsessing about whether a man should be allowed to use the ladies’ toilets than terrorism 


Farage says current results of election are ‘bigger than Brexit’

For a brief moment it seemed, too, that the Clintons were not going to accept the result. Even as it became glaringly apparent that Trump was heading for victory, the Democratic Party chairman turned up on TV declaring that there would be no concession.

Those of us who remember the bitter 2000 contest between George W. Bush and Al Gore in Florida had visions of the outcome being contested in court again.

When ‘liberals’ lose a democratic vote, they often resort to litigation. Look at the way in which petulant, resentful Remainers have taken legal action in a cynical attempt to derail the Brexit vote.

Both in Britain and America, the democratic will of the electorate has increasingly been usurped by judicial activism. If Clinton had won, she would have appointed to the Supreme Court judges hell-bent on advancing the ‘liberal’ agenda on everything from gun control to transgender rights.

Under Barack Obama, American politicians and judges have spent more time obsessing about whether a man should be allowed to use the ladies’ toilets than what to do about Islamist terrorism at home and abroad.

Trump tapped into the same sense of alienation and anger which inspired so many people in Britain to vote Leave
Trump tapped into the same sense of alienation and anger which inspired so many people in Britain to vote Leave

Although Trump is personally relaxed on issues such as gay marriage and abortion, he can be relied upon to appoint judges to uphold the constitution, not pursue a Leftist political crusade.

His victory is a timely reminder to all those in Britain who think they can use the courts to thwart the democratic process.

It should also serve as a warning to MPs planning to disrupt Britain’s departure from the EU. There will be a day of reckoning at the ballot box.

Although we don’t have a presidential system, there is a danger that if our judges and elected representatives keep defying the properly expressed wishes of the people, the backlash could some day propel a Trump-type figure into 10 Downing Street.

The day of reckoning for America’s political class came yesterday. A rank outsider — given lukewarm support by his own party’s leadership and faced with an overwhelmingly hostile media — overcame the odds to capture the most powerful office on earth.

No other candidate, with the possible exception of Nigel Farage, has ever been so roundly vilified.

Trump is not a likeable man. He’s a braggart, a liar and borderline racist (in the sense that he says he’s going to build a wall along America’s southern borders to keep out illegal Mexican immigrants).

Yet his core message on Islamist terrorism, illegal immigration and American jobs being lost to cheap foreign competition, resonated in the heartlands.

His pitch was not dissimilar to that of the extreme elements of the Brexit campaign.

The more he was attacked by the Establishment and the pro-Clinton media, the greater his appeal to the disillusioned and dispossessed. Like Brexit, he managed to enlist the support of those who seldom — in some cases, never — bother to vote.

Millions of Americans turned out across the country for his rallies. The only time his opponent came anywhere near matching his crowds was when she surrounded herself with A-list Lear Jet Liberals.

The Bush family’s betrayal of the grassroots Republican voters who put them into office was manifest in their refusal to back Trump (George W Bush and wife Laura Bush)


But the abiding impression is that the masses had come to see Bruce Springsteen or Katy Perry (whoever she is), not Hillary.

Of course, Trump is a celebrity in his own right, thanks to reality TV. But one of these days it might dawn on pop stars and actors that their artistic talent and popularity doesn’t give them the right to impose their political prejudices on their fanbase.

In fact, it could well prove counter-productive. There’s no accurate polling data, but my guess would be that the majority of Springsteen’s blue-collar followers will have voted for Trump. Sucking up to Crooked Hillary may have earned him a few brownie points in the music industry and Hollywood, but it won’t shift many copies of his new autobiography.

When Springsteen sang at the final Clinton rally in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, he performed an acoustic version of his Eighties disco hit Dancing In The Dark. He couldn’t have chosen a more appropriate song.

As it turned out, the Clinton campaign, the pollsters and the pundits were all dancing in the dark. Pennsylvania voted Trump. It was the state which pushed him over the line and forced Clinton to concede.

Springsteen would have been better off reviving his hero Bob Dylan’s Ballad Of A Thin Man, which contains the line: ‘Something is happening here, but you don’t know what it is, do you, Mr Jones?’

Well, they do now. The people have spoken and the political class must get the message or perish — both in America and Britain.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3922210/Why-Trump-s-victory-timely-reminder-Britain-defy-people-RICHARD-LITTLEJOHN.html

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